Health

Pat Harrington Jr., 'One Day at a Time,' Dies - Struggle with Alzheimer’s

January 7th, 2016
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Pat Harrington Jr., 'One Day at a Time,' Dies - Struggle with Alzheimer’s

The actor who played "The Super" on the hit TV comedy “One Day at a Time” passed away at age 86. He was best known for his role as cocky superintendent Dwayne Schneider. The CBS comedy “One Day at a Time”, aired from December 1975 to May 1984, starred Bonnie Franklin as a divorced mom raising two teenage girls (Mackenzie Phillips, Valerie Bertinelli) in an apartment in Indianapolis.

Harrington, who won a Golden Globe in 1981 and an Emmy Award in 1984 for his work on the show, died Wednesday night in Los Angeles surrounded by his family, his daughters Tresa and Terry reported on Facebook. Their father had been suffering from Alzheimer’s and recently had been hospitalized after a fall.

Tresa Harrington said in a statement on her Facebook page that Harrington died on Wednesday evening (January 7, 2016). She did not give a cause of death but had written in early December that he was suffering from Alzheimer's disease and was in declining health after a fall and a brain hemorrhage.

Alzheimer’s is one of many issues which cause people to require help with activities of daily living or supervision due to memory issues. “Long Term Care” has increased over the years as more people live longer than ever before. The number of U.S. adults 65 and older — roughly 40 million as of the 2010 census — is expected to nearly double to 71 million by 2030 and to reach 98 million by 2060, according to a report published by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Magazine. The cost of this care is generally out-of-pocket unless a person has Long Term Care Insurance. Health Insurance and Medicare pay little or nothing toward this type of care.

"My heart is broken to pieces and I will cry and cry until I just won't," Tresa Harrington wrote.

She had wrote earlier, “I weep, knowing that he is not long on this earthly plane; cussing at him today to get him to open his mouth to eat the pureed food, as his swallowing mechanism isn’t functioning so well, but then alas, he opens his mouth for ice cream.”

She continued, “I break down, laying my head on his chest, and the first sign of recognition, as he places his hand behind my head, to comfort me. He wanted to ease my pain,” she explained. “I pray that whatever happens, in the next days or weeks, that it is for the best.”

Harrington worked opposite James Garner in the 1963 films The Wheeler Dealers and Move Over, Darling and also showed up on the big screen in Easy Come, Easy Go (1967) with Elvis Presley, The President’s Analyst (1967) with James Coburn, 2000 Years Later (1969) with Terry-Thomas and The Candidate (1972) with Robert Redford.

On television, Harrington appeared on many game shows and on such series as Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Beverly Hillbillies, The Flying Nun, F Troop, The Munsters, The Rookies, McMillan and Wife, The Wayans Bros., Murder, She Wrote and Curb Your Enthusiasm.

In 2012, Harrington made his final onscreen appearance, appearing as the manager of an apartment building on Bertinelli’s Hot in Cleveland.